An Introduction To Ayurveda

In the true sense of the term, the origin of medicine is as old as life itself. The existence of the species stresses that instantaneously with the presence of disease, all living things must have also progressed the means to battle disease. The advanced animals are directed by instinct to seek medications for illnesses in herbs and plants. Man, with his greater intelligence must essentially have extended the possibility of this search for remedies.

Every human society must have advanced an elementary system of medicine, whether grounded on material medica or in spells, rituals and incantations magic, which to us in this forward-thinking age may seem worthless. The advancement from this primitive stage to a regular medicine system has not been in the same positions everywhere. The development of a medicine system depends on numerous aspects; its form and content are decided by civilization and the environment in which it is born.

The word Ayurveda is the amalgamation of two words - AYU + VEDA. AYU signifies life and VEDA signifies knowledge or science. Therefore, Ayurveda means “the science of life”.

Ayurveda Embraces All


Ayurveda Embraces All

Ayurveda embraces all living things, human and Non-human. It is divided into three main branches namely, Nara Ayurveda which deals with human life, Satva Ayurveda which deals with animal life and its diseases, Vriksha Ayurveda which deals with the life of the plant, its development and diseases. It is amply clear that in fact, Ayurveda is not only a system of medicine but also a means of life for comprehensive positive health and spiritual accomplishments.

Ayurveda trusts that positive health is the foundation for accomplishing four precious goals of life (chaturvidha purushartha) namely, Dharma, Artha, Kama, Moksha. All these four goals cannot be attained without sound positive health.

Brief History of Ayurveda ( Hold On Its Bit Looong :)

Ayurveda is well-thought-out by many scholars to be the oldest healing science. In Sanskrit language, Ayurveda means “The Science of Life.” More than 5,000 years ago, Ayurvedic knowledge originated in India and is frequently called the “Mother of All Healing.” It stems from the initial Vedic culture and was communicated for thousands of years in an oral tradition from proficient masters to their disciples. Some of this information pertaining to Ayurveda was set to print a few thousand years before, but much of it is out-of-the-way. But the philosophies of many of the natural healing systems nowadays familiar in the West have their origins in Ayurveda, including Polarity and Homeopathy Therapy.

Ayurveda is said to be an everlasting science that primarily existed in the world-wide consciousness (Brahma) before it was passed from the originator to the ancient Indian mystics through meditation.The real origins of Ayurveda stretch deep into ancient times. From 3300–1300 BCE; a Bronze Age civilization thrived in the Indus Valley. Many of the spices and foods we associate with Ayurvedic cuisine, including mung, rice, beans, urad dal, turmeric, and ginger, were previously being cultivated in these ancient times. After some years, the center of civilization shifted to the Ganges basin, where folks who treated themselves to the Arya or noble ones practiced a positive and life-affirming

spirituality briefed in the Vedas. Logically composed between 500 and 1000 BCE in an ancient form of Sanskrit, the Vedas celebrate the rudiments of life, particularly water, fire, wind, and, as well as Mother Earth and the animals and plants who expatiate her. Many herbs are unknown and some still used in Ayurveda in nowadays, were formerly described in the Vedas.

As the Gangetic or Vedic civilization entered into the Iron Age at around 600 BCE, a spirit of reason and emerging dawned across the known world, with Aristotle and Plato giving their teachings in Greece, the Hebrew fortune-tellers in the Middle East and the Buddha in Northern India. Indian approaches of healing shook off age-old trimmings of fallacy and attained a clarity, depth of reasoning, and deep philosophical foundation that has characterized Ayurveda ever since. From this awakening of pragmatism and reason, the texts pertaining to Ayurveda, explicitly Charak Samhita and Sushrut Samhita, ascended. After centuries of refinement and clarification, these texts presumed their existing form during India’s Golden Age, under the Empire of Gupta, 320 to 550 CE.India, the remarkable land of spices, peacocks, gems, and rich textiles, has always been an appealing prospect to invaders and traders alike. The inherent lenience that typifies India has enabled her to fascinate inspirations from the outside world while absorbing her own culture. Therefore, despite attacks by Mongols and Genghis Khan the in the 13th century, and the subjugation of much of India by the Mughals in the 16thcentury, Ayurveda sustained as the medicine of choice for the majority of people, and even relished equal patronage to Arabic or Unani medicine during Emperor Akbar’s reign.

Appearing primarily as traders in the form of the East India Company and then later as a direct rule by the British Crown from the year 1858 to 1947, the British required to execute their civilization version upon India. From the establishment of the Indian Medical Service in 1763, the Western medicine of the day was understood as normative. There were positive changes at this time. British botanists functioned to accrue the knowledge of Indian medicinal plants, both through scholarly books and the establishment of botanical gardens – unintentionally remaining an effort that had started in Vedic times. But the extended arm of the territory was ill-suited to separate the quacks from trustworthy practitioners, particularly of an ancient knowledge that was so diverse from their own. As a result, many of the extraordinary Ayurvedic texts, techniques, and teachers were quietened. Ayurveda survived on the real fabrics of society in rural areas where the traditional methods of living were preserved. As India regained her independence, Ayurveda, along with Siddha and Unani medicinal systems were invigorated and recognized by the recently formed government.In the mid- to the late- twentieth century, searchers from the West started to travel to India the teachings of Ayurveda and Yoga were revived by a generation disillusioned with the materialism and reductionism that had come to describe Western thought, introducing an interest explosion that thrives to this very day. In addition, NAMA’s Advisory Board members, clinics and schools started bouncing up across the country, giving upsurge to the requirement for professionalization and solidarity that brought forth to NAMA. Deeply rooted in remote antiquity, and having continued and grown-up through the fluxes of time, Ayurveda now comes across a bright future in India, the USA and across the world.

Ayurveda History

India, the remarkable land of spices, peacocks, gems, and rich textiles, has always been an appealing prospect to invaders and traders alike. The inherent lenience that typifies India has enabled her to fascinate inspirations from the outside world while absorbent her own culture. Therefore, despite attacks by Mongols and Genghis Khan the in the 13th century, and the subjugation of much of India by the Mughals in the 16thcentury, Ayurveda sustained as the medicine of choice for the majority of people, and even relished equal patronage to Arabic or Unani medicine during Emperor Akbar’s reign.

Appearing primary as traders in the form of the East India Company and then later as a direct rule by the British Crown from the year 1858 to 1947, the British required to execute their civilization version upon India. From the establishment of the Indian Medical Service in 1763, the Western medicine of the day was understood as normative. There were positive changes at this time. British botanists functioned to accrue the knowledge of Indian medicinal plants, both through scholarly books and the establishment of botanical gardens – unintentionally remaining an effort that had started in Vedic times. But the extended arm of the territory was ill-suited to separate the quacks from trustworthy practitioners, particularly of an ancient knowledge that was so diverse from their own. As a result, many of the extraordinary Ayurvedic texts, techniques, and teachers were quietened. Ayurveda survived on the real fabrics of society in rural areas where the traditional methods of living were preserved. As India regained her independence, Ayurveda, along with Siddha and Unani medicinal systems were invigorated and recognized by the recently formed government.

In the mid- to the late- twentieth century, searchers from the West started to travel to India the teachings of Ayurveda and Yoga were revived by a generation disillusioned with the materialism and reductionism that had come to describe Western thought, introducing an interest explosion that thrives to this very day. In addition, NAMA’s Advisory Board members, clinics and schools start ed bouncing up across the country, giving upsurge to the requirement for professionalization and solidarity that brought forth to NAMA. Deeply rooted in remote antiquity, and having continued and grown-up through the fluxes of time, Ayurveda now comes across a bright future in India, the USA and across the world.

Ayurveda and its Relevance in Modern Times


Ayurveda Modern Time

Ayurveda has been around for thousands of years and was well-thought-out as one of the finest means to treat diseases and lead a healthy lifestyle in ancient India. Because of the implication in maintaining good health, we initiate using the philosophies and concepts of Ayurveda in our modern world too.

Ayurveda balances our contemporary lifestyle and health-related habits with the ancient wisdom and knowledge of using natural substances, herbs and medicines to assist us to lead a happy, healthy, and disease-free and stress-free life. Officially, Ayurveda was recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1976.

The fundamental aim and objective of Ayurveda is to restore the balance between body, mind, and spirit. Ayurveda categorizes all individuals and body types into three categories, including Earth and Water (Kapha); Fire and Water (Pitta) and Air and Ether (Vata). Consequently, all treatments pertaining to Ayurveda and treatments differ from individuals to individuals reliant on the fact that they belong to which prementioned type of body. Each individual wants to carry out the exercises, meditation, yoga, and take nutrition depending on the constitution of one’s body.

Ayurveda claims that you will stay disease-free, as long as you are consuming as per your body type and carrying out the exercises accordingly. The primary requisites of living an Ayurveda-inspired healthy life include nutritious food, meditation, and yoga. If you are engaged in these three activities, you can avert a lot of diseases, lead a happy and healthy life and function optimally each day. With the implication of the Ayurvedic way of life, we can beat a stressful life, which is one of the fundamental reasons for an array of health issues that individuals suffer from in this modern world.

Benefits of Ayurveda


  • Less requirement for Western medical treatments
  • Important decrease in anxiety and stress
  • Reduces symptoms from chronic conditions (For example, skin conditions, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, allergies, arthritis hypertension)
  • Augments immunity and reduces illness frequency
  • Improves sleep quality that comes effortlessly and naturally
  • Provides healthier, stronger bones, nails, and hair
  • Offers better connection with hormonal rhythms and how to manage them

Five Elements of Ayurveda


Ayurveda Elements

In Ayurveda, the five rudiments are discoursed but are more like philosophical notions rather than elements in the scientific sense. They are the rudimentary principles of the universe and hence represent the main mechanisms of all living things.

Earth (Principle of Inertia):

The earth element represents the solid state of matter and accompanied by water, is really responsible for the physical composition of the human body. Bones, teeth, and tissues are all considered as earth rudiments. Earth connects to the nose and the smell sense. Water and Earth form the Kapha dosha.

Water (Principle of Cohesion):

Water signifies the liquid state of matter. Water specifies instability or change. Water is responsible for the fluid metabolism within the body; consequently, blood, lymph, and other fluids are measured as water rudiments. Water connects to the tongue and the taste sense. Water is the foremost component in the Kapha dosha.

Fire (Principle of Radiance):

The fire component signifies form without substance. The fire has the power to transfer the substance state. In the human body, it is responsible for digestion and perception and connected to the eyes and hence sight. Fire is the leading element in the Pitta dosha.

Wind (Principle of Vibration):

Wind or air signifies the vaporous state of matter. It designates mobility and dynamics. In the body, the wind component is responsible for the respiratory system and essential for all transfer of energy as air is the important element required for fire to burn. Wind connects to the skin which perceives touch. Air is the foremost component in the Vata dosha.

Ether (Principle of Pervasiveness):

The component of ether characterizes the space in which the whole thing takes place. It tells all empty or hollow places in the body, such as all our channels, pores and the ears that observe sound. Together with the air, this component formulates the Vata dosha.

These rudiments can be allocated to diverse regions in the human body and are each associated with the five senses. Linked together assets, they can evident in a Dosha, known as a constitution of the body.

Three Doshas & Body Types

Doshas are of three types such as Vata, pitta, and Kapha. Doshas are one of the most foundational aspects of the conventional system of Ayurveda. But exactly what are they? In real meaning, the doshas are vigorous forces of nature, functional principles that assist us to understand ourselves, and the world around us.

Vata, pitta, and Kapha are each necessary to our physiology in some way. Therefore no one dosha is better than, or superior to any other doshas. Each dosha has a very explicit set of functional roles to play in the human body.

The three doshas are mentioned below :

Vata (Air + Ether):


  • It is regarded as by the mobile nature of Wind (Air) energy.

Pitta (Fire + Water):


  • It embodies the transformative quality of Fire energy

Kapha (Water + Earth):


  • It reflects the obligatory nature of Water energy

Qualitative Nature of the Doshas:


Dosha Important Qualities
Vata Dry, Cold Light, Rough, Mobile, Subtle, Clear
Pitta Hot, Light, Sharp, Liquid, Oily, Spreading
Kapha Heavy, Cool, Slow, Oily, Dense, Smooth, Soft, Gross, Stable, Cloudy

Doshas and Their Functions:

Dosha Primary Functions
Vata Movement & Communication
Pitta Digestion & Transformation
Kapha Cohesiveness, Structure & Lubrication

Dosha Imbalances

Tips to Balance Dosha

Here there are the most important considerations for balancing Vata, Pitta, and Kapha:

Balancing Vata

Vata signifies movement. When out of balance, it causes major problems in mind and body related to unbalanced movements such as constipation, variable appetite, poor circulation. insomnia, etc. Several individuals with a Vata-influenced constitution love multiplicity, but they require a regular routine framework to remain stable and grounded while enjoying and pursuing that diversity.

Vata Balancing Tips


  • Get to bed before 10 pm
  • Try to maintain a regular daily routine
  • Pursue a Vata-pacifying diet
  • Favor hot beverages
  • Food must be warm, freshly ready and oily
  • Use moderate amounts of sesame oil, olive oil, Ghee, butter, and coconut oil
  • Stay away from caffeinated beverages, alcohol, and chocolate
  • Avoid raw or gas-forming vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, etc.)
  • Have a little boiled milk with cardamom before going to bed with 2-4 tablets of Digestone
  • Practice Transcendental Meditation

Balancing Pitta

Pitta signifies transformation and metabolism. When out of balance, Pitta causes a wide range of problems pertaining to excessive heat and acidity in body and mind such as acid indigestion, anger, rashes, and fever. Individuals with a Pitta-influenced formation tend to be ambitious, industrious, and competitive. Therefore, Pitta often needs moderation.

Pitta Balancing Tips


  • Develop moderation in all things and do not take yourself too seriously
  • Get to bed prior to 10 PM
  • Be careful not to over-work
  • Don’t strain the eyes with TV or computer particularly in the evening
  • Allocate time for playing with children
  • Avoid getting over-heated or too embroiled in competitive sports
  • Enjoy exercise
  • Practice skiing, swimming, walking in nature by bodies of water, yoga, cycling, etc.
  • Defend yourself from the mid-day sun
  • Take time to eat a healthy lunch
  • Favor cool, but not ice-cold, beverages
  • Take freshly Food and fairly oily
  • Avid vinegar, chili, peppers, alcohol salt, tobacco, etc.
  • The primary thing in the morning after brushing the teeth and rinsing the mouth, drink some pure water left overnight in a cup of pure copper
  • Practice Transcendental Meditation

Balancing Kapha

Kapha signifies structure. Kapha is stable by nature, slow and opposed to change. That is both a curse and a blessing. When out of balance, Kapha causes a wide range of problems in body and mind pertaining to accumulation and stagnation, such as slow digestion, obesity, respiratory congestion, depression, and lethargy. Kapha requires physical activity and mental stimulation to stay in balance.

Kapha Balancing Tips


  • Get up and get active
  • Take a brisk walk soon after sunrise, preferably in a natural setting and beautiful
  • Walk briskly at least 10 minutes every few hours
  • Wake up by 6 AM without an alarm
  • Do Regular Exercise and energetically
  • Look for the challenge for your intellect
  • Take one tsp. uncooked honey in a half cup of lukewarm water to begin your day
  • Favor warm beverages
  • Food must be warm, freshly made and not too unctuous
  • Enjoy spices, particularly fresh ginger
  • Stay away from caffeinated beverages, alcohol, chocolate, and other sweets
  • Eat breakfast when you are truly hungry
  • Have a light food for dinner, if possible before 7 PM
  • Start off a habit of taking a liquid fast one day a week
  • Practice Transcendental Meditation
  • Do pranayama breathing practice

Ayurveda Medicines


  • It addresses the root causes of imbalance and disease, rather than just mere symptom management
  • Every person is treated as an exclusive individual and is provided customized wellness solutions in Ayurveda
  • It provides a holistic definition of health that comprises body, mind, soul, and senses
  • It detoxifies the body and has no side effect in using Ayurvedic medicine
  • It provides an efficient way to reduce stress and maintain the mood
  • It maintains body weight
  • It improves the state of declining health by regular intake of ayurvedic herbs or supplements
  • It empowers us to take of Ayurveda that emphasis solely on how to really be healthy and fit health into our own hands.
  • It also assists in gaining a balance of hormones in the body

Why Ayurveda?


Why Ayurveda

As a science, Ayurveda was primarily followed in India and it is a treatment for curing certain illnesses. As per Ayurveda, every plant, the tree has medicinal worth and can effortlessly treat our body. Ayurveda helps to treat the disease forever and the best part of Ayurveda treatment is that it is natural and has no side effects. Ayurveda products for conditions like weight loss, arthritis, gastric problems, mental stress, etc are still quite prevalent in the society. It focuses on disease formation and cures it internally. In addition, it repairs the damaged cells caused due to disease.

Permanent Cure

If you take Ayurvedic medicines, it can cure the person's disease forever. Ayurvedic medicines also remove all the bacteria from one’s body. It provides a healthier lifestyle through which you can augment your overall health.

No Side Effects

Ayurvedic medicines are made from natural herbs. Ayurvedic medicines treat the disease in a natural way without providing any side effects. These medicines are made from the extract of certain vegetables, fruits, spices and have no side effects.

Heals Chronic Disease

If you are suffering from any sort of chronic disease, Ayurvedic medicines are more effective for you. Especially, the diseases which are pertaining to your kidney, liver, stomach can be treated completely through Ayurvedic medicines. These help to revitalize your liver and the entire body and give a healthy body.

Natural Ingredients

Ayurvedic medicines are formulated with natural ingredients and don’t comprise any chemicals to form a medicine. There is a suitable natural method to make medicine. Ayurvedic medicines are made on the basis of organic formulations and more effective in comparison to another form of medicine.

Cures From the Roots

Ayurvedic treatment requires time to heal the disease forever. It focuses on the root cause of disease and heals the affected organ of your body. Various diseases like piles jaundice and constipation can be treated permanently through ayurvedic medicines.

Profession or Service:

By augmenting individuals’ health, Ayurveda provides service to mankind. They have no money-making idea for the treatment of the disease. They provide altruistic services.

Less Expensive and Safe:

Ayurvedic treatment and medicines are less expensive in comparison to allopathic medicines. Ayurvedic medicines are safe and cost-effective and provide permanent relief in the pain and cure the disease symptoms.

Cures the Diseases and Other Problems:

Ayurvedic medicines heal the disease and also cure the other problems pertaining to that disease. Compare to other allopathic formulations, Ayurvedic medicines are meant for a comprehensive treatment. It has a positive impact on human affect body from internally and externally.

Nice Philosophy:

Ayurveda is based on a philosophy that depicts a healthy and happy life. There should be a balance between the three Doshas - Vata, Pitta, Kapha. Other forms of medicines available in the market do not follow this philosophy and focused on the disease symptoms rather than the cause of the disease.

Organic and Environment-Friendly:

Ayurvedic medicines are organic and use natural products. They are also environment-friendly. They focus on saving the trees, forest, and defend the atmosphere from chemical pollution. Healthy health is very significant to live a better life.